Sound Income Strategies Launches Actively-Managed, Income Exchange-Traded Funds for Retirees and Those Saving for Retirement

Sound Income Strategies Launches Actively-Managed, Income Exchange-Traded Funds for Retirees and Those Saving for Retirement

FORT LAUDERDALE, Jan. 05, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —  – Sound Income Strategies, a Registered Investment Advisory firm specializing in the active… SAN MIGUEL CORP. (SMC) on Tuesday said its tollways are ready to go 100% cashless by Jan. 11 after it hit its target to open 156 new radio-frequency identification (RFID) installation stations before the end of December. In an e-mailed statement, SMC President and Chief… Find out how you may qualify for the Earn Income Tax Credit with or without claiming qualifying children or relatives on your tax return. Nuveen Senior Income Fund (NYSE:NSL) declared a dividend on Tuesday, January 5th, investing.com reports. Shareholders of record on Friday, January 15th will be paid a dividend of 0.0305 per share by the investment management company on Monday, February 1st. This represents a dividend yield of 7.07%. The ex-dividend date of this dividend is Thursday, January […]

FORT LAUDERDALE, Jan. 05, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —  – Sound Income Strategies, a Registered Investment Advisory firm specializing in the active management of income-generating portfolios, specifically for retirees and those planning for retirement, today announced the launch of two actively managed, income Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs) on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on December 31, 2020. The Sound Equity Income ETF (SDEI) and Sound Enhanced Fixed Income ETF (SDEF) seek to generate income at a time when rates are at ultra-low levels and Baby Boomers are unprepared for retirement. 1 With these ETFs, Sound Income Strategies’ income-generating insights provided to their clients over the past 20 years are now more broadly available. 

“When it comes to planning and saving for retirement, it’s all about investing for income. The new ETFs were created specifically for retirees and those approaching retirement who need income from their investments,” said David J. Scranton, CFA, Founder, Sound Income Strategies. “As long-time specialists in income-generating savings and investment strategies, we focus on maximizing the value of investors’ income portfolios and help them build retirement plans that seek to deliver dependable income first and foremost, with growth potential as a secondary consideration.”

The new ETFs are:

Sound Equity Income ETF (SDEI): The Sound Equity Income ETF is actively managed, and its primary objective is to generate current income via a dividend yield that is targeted to be at least two times that of the S&P 500 Index. SDEI’s secondary objective is to capture long-term capital appreciation. SDEI seeks to achieve its investment objectives by investing in common stock issued by dividend-paying, mid- and large-capitalization companies.

Sound Enhanced Fixed Income ETF (SDEF): The Sound Enhanced Fixed Income ETF is an actively managed ETF that seeks current income while providing the opportunity for capital appreciation by investing in fixed income securities. The ETF invests in a combination of investment grade and below investment grade (often referred to as “high yield” or “junk” bonds) debt securities. Typically, the ETF will have an approximate equal weighting of investment grade and high yield debt securities; however, the portfolio weighting will be adjusted from time to time based on the sub-adviser’s assessment.

Sound Income Strategies uses a fundamental, “bottom-up” approach to analyzing individual debt securities, which typically include U.S. and foreign corporate bonds; securities issued by governments and their agencies, instrumentalities, or sponsored corporations, including supranational organizations; preferred securities; and ETFs that invest in bonds, sovereign debt, and private placement debt securities. The ETF may also invest in shares of business development companies (“BDCs”) and real estate investment trusts (“REITs”).

David Scranton partnered with the team at Tidal ETF Services to bring the Sound ETFs to market.

ABOUT SOUND INCOME STRATEGIES

Sound Income Strategies is a Registered Investment Advisory firm specializing in the active management of income-generating portfolios. It was founded by David J. Scranton (CLU, ChFC, CFP®, CFA, MSFS), who has been recognized during his 30 years in the industry as an advisor who is particularly protective of his clients’ assets. For the past 20 years, he has specialized in the universe of income-generating savings and investment strategies. Sound Income Strategies’ vision is to change the face of retirement for Baby Boomers. Their income-generating strategies are available to the public through Sound Income Strategies’ easy-to-trade and low-cost exchange-traded funds (ETFs). These ETFs were created specifically for retirees and those approaching retirement who want income-producing investment flow. For more information, visit soundetfs.com.

ABOUT TIDAL ETF SERVICES

Formed by ETF industry pioneers and thought leaders, Tidal sets out to disrupt the way ETFs have historically been developed, launched, marketed and sold. With a transparent, partnership approach, Tidal offers a comprehensive suite of services, proprietary tools, and methodologies designed to bring lasting ideas to market. As advocates for ETF innovation, Tidal helps institutions and organizations launch the most interesting and viable ETFs available today. For more information, visit tidaletfservices.com.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Christine Hudacko
[email protected]
Phone: 415-999-1226

DISCLOSURES

Before investing you should carefully consider the Fund’s investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. This and other information is in the prospectus. A prospectus may be obtained by calling (833) 916-9056 or visiting www.soundetfs.com. Please read the prospectus carefully before you invest.

Investing involves risk, including the potential loss of principal. There is no guarantee that the Funds investment strategy will be successful. Shares may trade at a premium or discount to their NAV in the secondary market. The Funds are new and have a limited operating history. The Funds have a limited number of financial institutions that are authorized to purchase and redeem shares directly from the Fund; and there may be a limited number of market makers or other liquidity providers in the marketplace.

Since the Funds are actively managed they do not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The Funds may frequently trade all or a significant portion of their portfolio; and have higher portfolio turnover than funds that do seek to replicate the performance of an index.

SDEI-specific risks:
The securities of large-capitalization companies may be relatively mature compared to smaller companies and therefore subject to slower growth during times of economic expansion. The securities of mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse issuer, market, political, or economic developments than securities of large-capitalization companies.
The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund.

SDEF-specific risks:
Securities rated below investment grade are often referred to as high yield securities or “junk bonds.” Investments in lower rated corporate debt securities typically entail greater price volatility and principal and income risk. High yield securities may be more susceptible to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions than investment grade securities.  
The Fund may, at times, hold illiquid securities. The Fund could lose money if it is unable to dispose of an illiquid investment at a time or price that is most beneficial to the Fund.  
The Fund’s investments in bonds and other debt securities will change in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates rise, the value of these investments generally declines. Securities with greater interest rate sensitivity and longer maturities generally are subject to greater fluctuations in value. The Fund is considered to be non-diversified, which means that it may invest more of its assets in the securities of a single issuer or a smaller number of issuers than if it were a diversified fund.

The Funds are distributed by Foreside Fund Services, LLC.

Investment Advisory Services offered through Sound Income Strategies, LLC, an SEC Registered Investment Advisory Firm.

1 Source: Insured Retirement Institute. “Boomer Expectations for Retirement 2019”, April 2019. https://www.myirionline.org/docs/default-source/default-document-library/iri_babyboomers_whitepaper_2019_final.pdf?sfvrsn=0

Source: www.globenewswire.com

Author: Sound Income Strategies


SMC says its tollways are ready to go 100% cashless by Jan. 11

SMC says its tollways are ready to go 100% cashless by Jan. 11

SAN MIGUEL CORP. (SMC) on Tuesday said its tollways are ready to go 100% cashless by Jan. 11 after it hit its target to open 156 new radio-frequency identification (RFID) installation stations before the end of December.

In an e-mailed statement, SMC President and Chief Operating Officer Ramon S. Ang said: “Back in November, and again in mid-December, we committed to open over 100 new RFID stations in various locations before the end of the year.”

“Even as we were preoccupied with soft-opening our Skyway 3 and then had a long New Year’s break, I’m happy to report to the public that we also reached our target 156 Autosweep RFID installation stations last Dec. 29,” he added.

With the additional RFID installation stations, SMC is no longer seeing long lines towards the end of Jan. 11, Mr. Ang noted.

The Transportation department earlier set Dec. 1 as the deadline for toll operators to implement cashless payments, but the transition period will end on Jan. 11.

Toll operators will still be required to have lanes for the installation of RFID stickers beyond Jan. 11.

“With the amount of stickers we have already issued over the past few months, particularly from November through December when we started increasing the number of stations, coupled with now 156 total RFID stations that are well spread out through Metro Manila and neighboring cities and provinces, we see no major problems in serving the remaining number of motorists without stickers yet,” Mr. Ang explained.

SMC operates the STAR (Southern Tagalog Arterial Road) Tollway, South Luzon Expressway, Skyway, NAIA Expressway, and Tarlac-Pangasinan-La Union Expressway.

Mr. Ang reiterated SMC will retain its installation activities and “even expand programs to reach villages and barangays.” — Arjay L. Balinbin

Source: theinvestingdaily.com

Author: by


Who Qualifies for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) | Internal Revenue Service

Who Qualifies for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) | Internal Revenue Service

Low- to moderate-income workers with qualifying children may be eligible to claim the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) if certain qualifying rules apply to them.

You may qualify for the EITC even if you can’t claim children on your tax return. Find out how to claim the EITC without a qualifying child.

To qualify for the EITC, you must:

  • Show proof of earned income
  • Have investment income below $3,650 in the tax year you claim the credit
  • Have a valid Social Security number
  • Claim a certain filing status 
  • Be a U.S. citizen or a resident alien all year
  • The EITC has special qualifying rules for:

  • Military members
  • Clergy members
  • Taxpayers and their relatives with disabilities
  • If you’re unsure if you qualify for the EITC, use our Qualification Assistant.

    To qualify for the EITC, everyone you claim on your taxes must have a valid Social Security number (SSN). To be valid, the SSN must be:

  • Valid for employment
  • Issued before the due date of the tax return you plan to claim (including extensions)
  • For the EITC, we accept a Social Security number on a Social Security card that has the words, “Valid for work with DHS authorization,” on it.

    For the EITC, we don’t accept:

  • Individual taxpayer identification numbers (ITIN)
  • Adoption taxpayer identification numbers (ATIN)
  • Social Security numbers on Social Security cards that have the words, “Not Valid for Employment,” on them
  • For more information about the Social Security number rules for the EITC, see Rule 2 in Publication 596, Earned Income Credit.

    To qualify for the EITC, you must file your tax return using one of the following statuses:

  • Married filing jointly
  • Head of household
  • Qualifying widow or widower
  • Single
  • You can’t claim the EITC if your filing status is married filing separately.

    If you’re unsure about your filing status, use our EITC Qualification Assistant or the Interactive Tax Assistant.

    There are special rules if you or your spouse are a nonresident alien.

    You may claim the Head of Household filing status if you’re not married and pay more than half the costs of keeping up your home where you live with your qualifying child.

    Related: About Publication 501, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information.

    To file as a qualifying widow or widower, all the following must apply to you:

  • You could have filed a joint return with your spouse for the tax year they died. It does not matter if you filed a joint return.
  • Your spouse died less than 2 years before the tax year you’re claiming the EITC and you did not remarry before the end of that year
  • You paid more than half the cost of keeping up a home for the year
  • You have a child or stepchild you can claim as a relative. This does not include a foster child.
  • This child lived in your home all year, except for temporary absences. Note: There are exceptions for a child who was born or died during the year and for a kidnapped child. For more information, see Qualifying Child Rules, Residency.
  • Related:

  • About Publication 501, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information
  • Publication 519, U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens
  • If you paid more than half the total cost to keep up a home during the tax year you file your taxes, you meet the requirement of paying more than half the cost of keeping up the home.

    Costs include:

  • Rent, mortgage interest, real estate taxes and home insurance
  • Repairs and utilities
  • Food eaten in the home
  • Some costs paid with public assistance
  • Costs don’t include:

  • Money you got from Temporary Assistance for Needy Families or other public assistance programs
  • Clothing, education and vacations expenses
  • Medical treatment, medical insurance payments and prescription drugs
  • Life insurance
  • Transportation costs like insurance, lease payments or public transportation
  • Rental value of a home you own
  • Value of your services or those of a member of your household
  • To claim the EITC, you and your spouse (if filing jointly) must be U.S. citizens or resident aliens.

    If you or your spouse were a nonresident alien for any part of the tax year, you can only claim the EITC if your filing status is married filing jointly and you or your spouse is a:

  • U.S. Citizen with a valid Social Security number or
  • Resident alien who was in the U.S. at least 6 months of the year you’re filing for and has a valid Social Security number
  • You are eligible to claim the EITC without a qualifying child if you meet all the following rules. You (and your spouse if you file a joint tax return) must:

  • Meet the EITC basic qualifying rules
  • The United States includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. military bases. It does not include U.S. possessions such as Guam, the Virgin Islands or Puerto Rico
  • Not be claimed as a qualifying child on anyone else’s tax return

  • Be at least age 25 but under age 65 at the end of the tax year (usually Dec. 31)
  • You are not eligible to claim the EITC if:

  • Your filing status is married filing separately
  • You filed a Form 2555 (related to foreign earned income)
  • You or your spouse are nonresident aliens. For exceptions, see Nonresident Spouse Treated Like a Resident.
  • If you claim the EITC, your refund may be delayed. By law, we have to wait until March to issue refunds to taxpayers who claim the EITC.

    After you file your return, use Where’s My Refund? or the IRS2Go mobile app to track your refund.

    If you qualify for the EITC, you may also qualify for other tax credits.

  • Child Tax Credit and the Credit for Other Dependents
  • Child and Dependent Care Credit
  • Education Credits
  • EITC Qualification Assistant
  • What to do if We Denied Your EITC in the Past
  • Find out what you need to bring to your preparer
  • Source: www.irs.gov


    Nuveen Senior Income Fund Plans Dividend of $0.03 (NYSE:NSL)

    Nuveen Senior Income Fund Plans Dividend of $0.03 (NYSE:NSL)

    Nuveen Senior Income Fund logoNuveen Senior Income Fund (NYSE:NSL) declared a dividend on Tuesday, January 5th, investing.com reports. Shareholders of record on Friday, January 15th will be paid a dividend of 0.0305 per share by the investment management company on Monday, February 1st. This represents a dividend yield of 7.07%. The ex-dividend date of this dividend is Thursday, January 14th.

    Shares of NYSE:NSL traded up $0.03 on Tuesday, reaching $5.21. The company’s stock had a trading volume of 58,377 shares, compared to its average volume of 54,839. Nuveen Senior Income Fund has a 52-week low of $3.13 and a 52-week high of $6.16. The company has a 50-day simple moving average of $5.12 and a 200 day simple moving average of $4.89.

    Nuveen Senior Income Fund Company Profile

    Dividend History for Nuveen Senior Income Fund (NYSE:NSL)

    Receive News & Ratings for Nuveen Senior Income Fund Daily – Enter your email address below to receive a concise daily summary of the latest news and analysts’ ratings for Nuveen Senior Income Fund and related companies with MarketBeat.com’s FREE daily email newsletter.

    Source: www.themarketsdaily.com

    Author: Kim Johansen


    Sound Income Strategies Launches Actively-Managed, Income Exchange-Traded Funds for Retirees and Those Saving for Retirement

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