Apple Fitness+ Service Envisioned Long Before Work-From-Home, Executives Say

Apple Fitness+ Service Envisioned Long Before Work-From-Home, Executives Say

Apple’s new paid online fitness class service, designed to work with its Apple Watch, was a long-planned extension of the watch’s fitness features rather than a quick reaction to a pandemic that has closed many gyms, executives said in an interview. The Fitness+ service is Apple’s first subscription geared to make money directly from the … Company: Vineyard Convenience Job Title: Junior Accounts / Admin Clerk Location: Cape Town, Western Cape Job Description We are a 24h Retail business in Claremont/Newlands. Our business consists… If your child hasn’t been homeschooled, remote learning can take some serious getting used to. As many schools are still holding class sessions online, During the pandemic, artists must adapt to how they do business. This Saturday, a Battle Creek doll maker is taking her annual Halloween show online.

Apple’s new paid online fitness class service, designed to work with its Apple Watch, was a long-planned extension of the watch’s fitness features rather than a quick reaction to a pandemic that has closed many gyms, executives said in an interview.

The Fitness+ service is Apple’s first subscription geared to make money directly from the sensor-packed device it has been selling since 2014.

The service, which Apple said will be available by the end of the year, has new workouts each week filmed by a team of trainers in a purpose-built studio in Los Angles and focuses on exercises that require little or no gym equipment, using Apple Watch sensors to track progress.

Many analysts viewed the service, which was announced on Tuesday, as well timed for a work-from-home world. But Apple Chief Operating Officer Jeff Williams said in an interview on Wednesday that work on the service started “quite a while ago.” He described it as “a natural extension of the goal of Apple Watch, which is to help people live a better day.”

“At least pre-Covid, if you could write one prescription for the world from physicians, it would have been to be more active. It’s so powerful,” Williams said in a press briefing. “So anything we do in that realm that helps people be more active is something we’re excited about.”

Once gyms do reopen, the Fitness+ service will also work with compatible gym equipment such as smart treadmills. The service will cost $10 (roughly Rs. 700) per month or $80 (roughly Rs. 5,900) per year.

Jay Blahnik, senior director of fitness technologies at Apple, said the service’s goal is to reach as broad an audience as possible and that Apple aimed to assemble a diverse lineup of instructors.

“We have trainers in their 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s and even their 60s. Showcasing that kind of diversity was really important to us because how we move and how we train is different as we age,” Blahnik said.

© Thomson Reuters 2020

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Source: thetechnomaster.com

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LEARNERSHIP/GENERAL WORK PROGRAMME

LEARNERSHIP/GENERAL WORK PROGRAMME

Company: Vineyard Convenience
Job Title: Junior Accounts / Admin Clerk
Location: Cape Town, Western Cape

We are a 24h Retail business in Claremont/Newlands. Our business consists of a large Engen Fuel Station with a Woolworths FoodStop, Steers, Corner Bakery with Equatorial Coffee and a Butchers Best Biltong Bar. We require a Clerk to join our Admin Department.

Position requires the candidate to reconcile daily POS sales and banking reports. The candidate will also be required to capture supplier invoices and credit notes and other general admin duties.

Salary is : R6,500.00 to R7,500.00 negotiable based on experience and qualifications

  • Matric (With Maths and accounting)
  • Additional Qualification will be an advantage
  • 2 – 3 years’ experience in an accounting environment
  • Must be able to work under pressure and meet deadlines
  • Must be able to work accurately and in good habit of self-checking work for errors
  • Able to work with little supervision
  • Must have Reconciliation skills (Shift Reconciliation, Balancing of Cash, Credit Cards etc.)
  • Debtors and Creditors experience (Capturing of Invoices etc.)
  • Computer Literate (Strong knowledge of Excel)
  • Have knowledge of an accounting package (Engen Branch an advantage)
  • Able to work some week ends

Email CV: [email protected]

If you have not heard from us within 4 weeks consider your application
unsuccessful

Author: Admin

Source: mysachannel.com

Author: Author: Admin


SEVEN WAYS TO GET KIDS TO PAY ATTENTION DURING REMOTE LEARNING THAT ACTUALLY WORK

SEVEN WAYS TO GET KIDS TO PAY ATTENTION DURING REMOTE LEARNING THAT ACTUALLY WORK

If your child hasn’t been homeschooled, remote learning can take some serious getting used to. As many schools are still holding class sessions online, due to the Coronavirus pandemic, parents may notice that their students, no matter the age, are becoming more and more restless in front of the camera and finding it harder and harder to pay attention.

“Some kids are transitioning to this new learning better and easier than other kids,” said Megan Allen, 2010 Florida Teacher of the Year and founder of Tailored Learning Supports for Families, in an interview with Huffpost.com. “Recognize that paying attention online might be harder for some kids. And that’s OK! Some kids need more strategies.”

And amazing strategies did the experts get together and share! Here are seven ways to get your kids to pay attention during remote learning according to the Huffpost.com article in its entirety. Employ these tips, and help your students nail the fall semester. 

1. Know what it means to actually “pay attention.”

“Break down what it means to pay attention. We say the phrase, but what does it mean? How does one ‘pay attention’ when they’re 7?” said Allen. “Sometimes we say things as adults that don’t translate to kids. This is one of them.”

2. Make a dedicated, consistent learning space for them.

This one can be hard for families without a ton of space. I, for example, have two adults and two kids crammed into a teeny walk-up apartment. But it really is important, experts say. “It doesn’t matter if it’s the kitchen, living room or basement, but it should be free of distractions such as phones and TV, and most importantly it should be consistent,” said Sarah Brown Wessling, 2010 National Teacher of the Year and Johnston High School English teacher. “Consistency is key for at-home learning because it signals to your child that it’s time to learn and be engaged.”

3. Let them fidget.

“Just like in school, some learners need to stand or fidget or move in order to pay attention,” Wessling said. “If this is your child, consider elevating your child’s screen onto a counter or on a stack of books so they can stand. I’m also a big fan of black binder clips for fidgeting.”

“For many of us, we can pay attention better when we are rubbing a piece of sandpaper in our pocket, playing with a rubber band … moving our hands or feet,” echoed Allen. “The good ol’ bungee cord around the bottom of the chair is a fun one for feet movement.”

4. Find the best placement…for you.

“Be aware of your proximity,” Wessling said. “Some children will work better when you are close, but not hovering. Others will work better with more independence and prefer an occasional check-in. What works for your child is the right thing to do.”

5. Work in movement breaks. Lots of them.

“Kids (and adults) need to move while in front of the camera or computer!” Allen urged. “Maybe you and your kiddo have a secret signal, and you let the teacher in on it. At that signal, your kiddo can get up and move.”

6. Talk to your kid’s teacher — more than ever before. 

“Advocate for your kid. Speak up, and early,” Allen said. “Open those lines of communication so you all can figure out this new landscape together.” 

7. Don’t discipline them.

“Avoid attaching immediate consequences to not paying attention. Especially early on in this experience, we don’t want our children to associate negativity with the desired behavior,” Wessling said. “Instead, affirm their good choices, model the behavior you’d most like to see, praise the small things and keep nudging them towards higher expectations.”

Do you have some tips that you have tried that are working for your and your family? Comment below. Your share may just be what someone else has been looking for!

Source: bckonline.com

Author: Tiffany Silva Writer and Editor


Battle Creek doll maker curates annual Halloween art show online during pandemic

Battle Creek doll maker curates annual Halloween art show online during pandemic

When her children step inside the house, Jennie Hepler-Takens wants them to enter a place of magic. 

Mushroom ornaments dangle from the ceiling. A glass orb changes color as it diffuses lavender oil. Handcrafted figurines of mythical creatures occupy crevices in the living room.

“Magic is something that you feel,” Hepler-Takens said. “It’s something that I think we each have inside of us, and, when we see something that resonates and wakes that up, we can feel it inside.”

The Battle Creek doll maker creates sculptures inspired by folklore hoping to bring a sense of magic and wonder to whomever “adopts” them.

On Saturday, Hepler-Takens is joining several artists from around the country to sell her work in the annual Bewitching Peddlers of Halloween show, which she curates. 

The show usually takes place at the Calhoun County Fairgrounds in Marshall. This year, it’s happening virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Everyone’s kind of having to reinvent how they put their work out into the world,” Hepler-Takens said. “It feels like the show, there’s so much magic in it. When so many artists come together, we feed off of each other’s excitement.”

Donald W. VanAuken, an instructor of Visual Art and Art History at Olivet College, said COVID-19 has made it difficult for those working in creative fields to make a living.

“Shows and exhibitions that you prepare for years in advance just evaporate and your clientele are holding off on purchases, considering the hard economic times people are facing,” said VanAuken. “One positive aspect for artists is that, in many instances, people have found other virtual outlets and networks to join.”

At the show this weekend, VanAuken plans to sell his hand-carved prints made from a wooden matrix but said he is going to miss the face-to-face interactions.

Judith Konesni and Michael Fortin, who own Avolio GlassWerks in Kalamazoo, said 22 of the art fairs they planned to attend this year were cancelled. 

“We feel like we’re gypsies on the road,” Konesni said. 

Konesi and Fortin are selling their hand-blown glass pumpkins, witch hats and ghosts on Saturday at the Bewitching Peddlers of Halloween show. Konesi will miss the costumes, food and “mystery” she experienced at the show last year.

The show was formerly called Ghoultide Gathering. Hepler-Takens and her late husband, Joseph Takens, bought it after its founders, Scott Smith and Bill Gilmore, retired.

For Hepler-Takens’ family, Halloween is like Christmas.

“There’s the whole childlike wonder of putting on a costume and running around trick-or-treating,” she said. “When I create in the genre of Halloween, I feel like it can be imperfect, like the pumpkins can be misshapen or different colors than what a pumpkin is and it’s accepted.”

Growing up, Hepler-Takens’ grandmother, who was also named Jennie, collected dolls that she couldn’t play with. Because of this, Hepler-Takens played with dolls she found at garage sales, flea markets and thrift stores.

“I was always drawn to things that were a little bit broken, and those resonated with me more than those porcelain, perfect, beautiful dolls,” Hepler-Takens said.

She once bought an entire collection of dolls that had burned in a fire at an estate sale.

Hepler-Takens writes stories for each character she creates. After the 2020 Bewitching Peddlers of Halloween show, she plans to start work on a children’s book called “The Story Box,” which is inspired by her 7-year-old daughter, Willow Takens. 

The artworks of Bewitching Peddlers of Halloween will go up for sale Saturday morning at 8 a.m. on the website www.bewitchingpeddlersofhalloween.com.

Joseph Takens, a glassblower by trade, passed away in July 2019 after a battle with lung cancer. Pieces of his legacy are kept alive in the glass blown eyes he created for his wife’s dolls.

This is Hepler-Takens second year running the show without him. She believes he would’ve made the most of the virtual event.

“I think he would be really proud that all of the artists pulled together, and it’s not just a show, it’s a community and every single one of us supports each other,” Hepler-Takens said. “I think he would just be really proud and rolling with the punches, he would just be giggling and laughing.”

Alyssa Keown is a visual journalist at the Battle Creek Enquirer. Contact her at [email protected] or (269) 832-9344. Follow her on Instagram @aj.keown and on Twitter @alyssa_keown

Source: www.battlecreekenquirer.com


Apple Fitness+ Service Envisioned Long Before Work-From-Home, Executives Say


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