Opening September 17th: Vernon Fisher “Angel Face” – An Exclusive ARTSY Online Exhibition

Opening September 17th: Vernon Fisher “Angel Face” – An Exclusive ARTSY Online Exhibition

Vernon Fisher “Angel Face”: An Exclusive ARTSY Online Exhibition View Now at: https://bit.ly/3i94elS VERNON FISHER’s new paintings are typically enigmatic; at first they seem humorous, yet on further study they reveal deeper subtext and irony. The predominant images are from Otto Preminger’s largely forgotten 1952 film Angel Face, starring Robert Mitchum and Jean Simmons. As… Atlanta’s passing game success and pass rush prowess bode well for the future, but not much else does. Cameras, Safety & Security LCS2 or Lead Conversion Squared is an effective digital marketing program that has been designed for businesses of all shapes and sizes. With this CRM… While the internet has made it easy for photographers to showcase their images, it has also made it easy for people to steal them to post on their own websites or social media pages. When Toledo Public Schools’ systems went dark on the day its 22,000 students were supposed to log in for the start of fall classes, people were quick to …

Vernon Fisher “Angel Face”: An Exclusive ARTSY Online Exhibition

View Now at: https://bit.ly/3i94elS

VERNON FISHER’s new paintings are typically enigmatic; at first they seem humorous, yet on further study they reveal deeper subtext and irony. The predominant images are from Otto Preminger’s largely forgotten 1952 film Angel Face, starring Robert Mitchum and Jean Simmons. As FISHER states:

It’s not a great movie, but I was interested in its generic film noir qualities, its “atmosphere,” and the fact that it wasn’t popular enough to be available on video – therefore there would be a minimum of nostalgic misreading. The actors and the genre provide a set of expectations for my misadventures with them in the paintings.

FISHER disrupts the atmosphere evoked by the film’s imagery with the addition of text and his familiar vignettes. There is a discrepancy between how each painting looks and what the added writing says. The text mimics typewriting, with numerous handwritten notations and corrections added, and is situated on each painting like a film subtitle. This serves to confuse the reading of the image and to further distance it from the cinematic source. The viewer is also engaged by the addition of the smaller, hovering vignettes, which may suggest anything from cartoon thought balloons to desktop icons.

Vernon Fisher was born in 1943 in Fort Worth, Texas. He studied English literature at the Hardin-Simmons University, where he received a BA in 1967. Vernon got his MFA in 1969, from the University of Illinois. As a true Fort Worth child, Fisher was raised and is still living in his hometown, where he enjoys appreciation as one of the Texas’s most internationally recognized artists.

The art of Vernon Fisher is included in the collections of more than 40 museums across the globe, such as the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C., Art Institute of Chicago, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Phoenix Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. The most important museum installation is in the collection of the famous Museum of Modern Art in New York.

#markmoorefineart #vernonfisher #artexhibition #artshow #painting #contemporarypainting #contemporaryart #artcollector #artcurator #artconsultant #artadvisor 

Source: markmooregalleryblog.com

Author: Posted on


What worked and what didn’t work for the Falcons in loss to the Seahawks

What worked and what didn’t work for the Falcons in loss to the Seahawks

Ahead of tomorrow’s recap and other roundups, I thought we’d take a quick look at what did and did not work for the Falcons against the Seahawks.

The short answer is that the team found they could pass their way to some considerable success, especially later in the game, and the pass rush was somewhere between good and stellar. The coaching, execution and secondary play, meanwhile, were between questionable and abysmal.

The Falcons had little trouble passing the ball throughout the game. Early on, Matt Ryan had an inexplicable intentional grounding and was consistently ineffective when throwing the ball to his running backs, but he was sterling silver when targeting his receivers against a largely overmatched Seattle secondary.

Ryan completed 30 of his 37 passes and 439 of his 450 yards throwing the ball to Julio Jones (9 receptions, 157 yards), Calvin Ridley (9 receptions, 130 yards, 2 touchdowns), Russell Gage (9 receptions, 114 yards), and Hayden Hurst (3 receptions, 38 yards). The overblown fretting about Gage as the third receiver likely goes away after this one, and Hurst clearly has room to grow into a more significant role as time goes on.

The passing game didn’t really get rolling until the Falcons were down by quite a bit, which is the one note of caution we’d offer up here. Still, it’s evident that Koetter can scheme wide receivers open this year, and he has the talent at receiver to punish defenses. That’s still the team’s best chance of winning going forward, and if they aren’t so intent on achieving balance early on, they can probably throw their way past most defenses.

While the final numbers weren’t superlative, the pass rush (and defensive line more generally) did a strong job in this one. That only makes the failures in the linebacker corps and particularly the secondary more glaring, but nonetheless.

Per Pro Football Focus, the Falcons pressured Russell Wilson on nearly 31% of his dropbacks, piling up 4 sacks in total (1 for Takk McKinley, 1.5 for Grady Jarrett, and .5 for Dante Fowler Jr.). The defense blew multiple great opportunities to get a stop after a sack, but that’s hardly the fault of a group doing its best to make Wilson uncomfortable and bringing him down multiple times. The Seattle offensive line is not superlative, but it’s fair to wonder what this defense can do when they face off against a quarterback that isn’t so capable of throwing on the move.

Atlanta spent money to bring in Darqueze Dennard, drafted A.J. Terrell in the first round, and got a healthy Keanu Neal back on the field. That was supposed to help turn this secondary into a strength, not a weakness, but after one week it seems like there’s quite a bit of work left to do.

Consider this: Despite the Falcons frequently pressuring Wilson, he completed 31 of 35 passes for 322 yards and 4 touchdowns, including an ugly wide open look to DK Metcalf down the sideline on 4th and 5 that went for a touchdown. That particular pass victimized Isaiah Oliver, but everyone got in on the fun, with a borderline call on Ricardo Allen ruining one potential stop, A.J. Terrell also getting crisped by Metcalf, and the Seahawks generally doing whatever they wanted to do through the air.

Wilson is phenomenal and this is a talented group of receivers overall, but that could not have been a worse start for a secondary looking to prove something. Unfortunately for them, they get Amari Cooper, Michael Gallup, and the rest of the gang in Dallas next Sunday.

The Falcons couldn’t seem to make the right decision Sunday, and even when they did they were undone by sloppiness.

In total, this team elected to go for it four times on fourth down, with the first time early in the game with the Falcons hanging around midfield. They would ultimately not convert a single one of those tries—Sharrod Neasman got the yards on a fake punt but fumbled—and as time went it on the early attempts seemed more and more ill-advised. The only time the Falcons had any luck slowing down a juggernaut Seattle defense was when Sterling Hofrichter pinned them pretty deep, something he was able to do twice in the first half, but Atlanta kept surrendering short fields and watching as Seattle romped to touchdowns. In all, their opponent would score three touchdowns and one field goal following those attempts,

Those were the most glaring examples—and for the record, the fake field goal attempt was a good call and late game 4th and 3 on the Seattle 35 was essentially a necessity—but the Falcons were once again undone by sloppiness and unimaginative decisions. Two straight short left targets to Ridley (neither complete) ruined one drive, a penalty on Matt Gono erased an extra point attempt, and the team essentially only completed passes over the middle of the field in the heart of the Seattle defense to Russell Gage, but tried several times regardless. The play calling really only loosened up on offense in the second half when it was too late, and the team either couldn’t get players in the right position or just had to watch them mess up on defense throughout.

The number of times we’ve been able to lean back and say “well, that was a well-coached game full of smart decisions” with the Falcons over the past few years has been a small number indeed. The number of games where that’s happened and the team hasn’t shot itself in the foot with penalties and poor plays is effectively zero.

Source: www.thefalcoholic.com

Author: Dave Choate


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LCS2 Reviews - Does Lead Conversion Squared Really Work? [2020 UPDATE] - SPONSORED CONTENT

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How Photography Entrepreneurs Can Protect Their Work From Image Theft

How Photography Entrepreneurs Can Protect Their Work From Image Theft

Photographer man shooting sunset at beach.

Digital technology has transformed the world of professional photography and enabled many people to turn a hobby into a successful business. But, while the internet has made it easy for photographers to showcase their images, it has also made it easy for people to steal them to post on their own websites or social media pages.

Chris Pearsall has been a freelance commercial photographer for 48 years, working mainly in corporate, PR, food, marine, and product photography. He has been the victim of image theft on more than one occasion, including an interior architectural shot of a theatre auditorium being used online by a national theatre listing company, and an exterior shot of Portsmouth Port terminal being used on the website of a large facilities company.

“In both cases, the images carried my contact details in the metadata, but no attempt was made to contact me for a license or permission to use,” he says.

London-based photographer Paul Clarke has spent the last ten years shooting almost anything people-related, from prisons to palaces, and has also had to resort to legal proceedings to pursue the theft of his work. One morning he woke up to five messages telling him that a national newspaper had run one of his photos in print and online.

He says: “The subject had been in a celebrity story, and they’d searched the internet for pictures. Mine was watermarked, but they just cut that off. My contact information was available; they ignored it.”

Clarke started infringement proceedings and eventually recovered damages, but says it is a constant problem for photographers, especially as an old photograph may suddenly become sought after as a story breaks. One of the biggest challenges, he says, is a lack of understanding about copyright.

“Myths abound: for example, if there’s no contact information visible, then the image isn’t under copyright,” he says. “A lot of people also believe they can use photos of themselves, freely. While this makes emotional sense – we think of our images as ‘ours’ – it has no legal basis.”

Julie Broadfoot has been a full-time professional photographer for 10 years, focusing mainly on portraits and personal branding for business owners, as well as small weddings and animal photography. Before the pandemic, she also shot live arts and corporate events and discovered that a well-known commercial organization had used one of her photos as the lead promotional image on their website.

“It was there for months before I found out,” she says. “After a few initial gentle emails back and forth, then more misuse by their web team, I invoiced them for breach of copyright. They quickly paid it, but in hindsight, it was worth a lot more money. I just panicked.”

While many photographers choose to pursue infringements themselves, in the U.K., either through the Small Claims Court or Intellectual Property Enterprise Court (IPEC), there has been a rapid growth in the number of agencies set up purely to chase copyright infringement on behalf of photographers. Pearsall puts all of his claims in the hands of his copyright agent in Germany, LAPIXA.

He says: “I upload batches of images to them and they run online image searches to find potential matches. They handle everything on my behalf and take a 40% cut of the final settlement fee. I don’t get as much return as if I’d done the footwork myself, but it leaves me free to concentrate on running my business.”

Before going down the legal route, there are a number of practical steps freelancers can take to minimize the risk of copyright infringement or use by third parties.

No image leaves Pearsall’s desktop without full Copyright information and contact details in the image metadata fields. “Sadly, this is often stripped when images are uploaded to third-party websites and I’m not aware of any way of preventing that,” he says.

Adding a watermark or other alteration to the html code, for example tiling and layering, renders the picture unusable. Some websites will allow ‘right-clicks’ to be disabled so that images can’t be downloaded, but this doesn’t work on every operating system.

“I’m still waiting for a coding genius to develop a file that can be embedded in an image to automatically degrade or destroy it once the official license period has ended,” adds Pearsall. “Now there’s a challenge for someone!”

It is important to check the terms and conditions of websites when uploading a picture to ensure that you are not inadvertently granting permission to use, and include appropriate terms and conditions on your own blog or website.

If you are granting limited rights in your photographic work, for example, for a competition or marketing event, ensure you have reviewed the relevant intellectual property clauses and have adequate protection on the purpose of use, length of use, and location.

Anna Caruso, associate at law firm Lewis Silkin, says: “If you believe your copyright has been breached, the first step is usually to make informal contact and notify the third party of your rights as the infringement may not have been intentional. If the third party is uncooperative other steps should be considered, including a take-down notice, if the infringement is online, or sending out a cease and desist letter, assuming there is a legal basis for claiming infringement.

“While some differences in copyright enforcement and protection do exist, for example around copyright exceptions where the U.S. adopts the open concept of ‘fair use’ versus the exhaustive list approach in the EU, the approach in the EU and U.S. is broadly the same, as both are based on the Berne Convention.”

However according to Clarke, it is a case of picking your battles. Some cases he has pursued directly, but in more complex cases he has appointed an agent.

He says: “If the claim is reasonable, it will generally be settled before proceeding to court, but you need to show evidence of the value that your images normally command, and that your claim is proportionate to any income you might have lost due to the infringement.

He also acknowledges that it is an ongoing challenge. “As photographers we naturally want to share, and market, our images, and that will always involve some risk,” he adds.“If something looks good on your site, it will look just as good on somebody else’s.”

Source: www.forbes.com

Author: Alison Coleman


With work, schooling happening online can the Internet keep up? Providers say yes

With work, schooling happening online can the Internet keep up? Providers say yes

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    Opening September 17th: Vernon Fisher “Angel Face” – An Exclusive ARTSY Online Exhibition


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